1501 W. Beauregard
San Angelo, Texas 76901
Phone: (325) 658-7750
Fax: (325) 658-8381
Crisis: (800) 375-8965
or (325) 653-5933

Nutrition
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Health Tip: The Facts About FatArtificial Sweeteners Trick the Brain: StudyHealth Tip: Fueling Your Body With ProteinProtein at All 3 Meals May Help Preserve Seniors' StrengthRich, Well-Educated Get Bigger Bang for Buck From Mediterranean DietSodium Intake >3.7 g/Day Linked to Adverse Cardiac StrainHealth Tip: Get the Facts About SalmonellaHealth Tip: Choosing Healthier Frozen Foods'Diet Foods' to SkipHealth Tip: Avoid Recipes With Raw EggHere's Why a Soda With That Burger Is Especially FatteningHealth Tip: Eat Less SugarResisting the Seduction of a BuffetType of Plant-Based Diet Affects Risk of Coronary Heart DiseaseHealth Tip: Eating WellNot All Plant Foods Are EqualA Healthy Diet May Help Ward Off DementiaHealth Tip: Learn About PasteurizationBetter Diet, Longer Life?Cognitive Function Up With Adherence to Mediterranean DietHealth Tip: Don't Pass the Salt, PleaseReset Your Taste Buds for Less SugarKeep Your Summer Cookouts SafeHealth Tip: Enjoy a Vegetarian MealHealth Tip: Packing for a Picnic7 Ways to Cut 50 Calories Every DayHealth Tip: When Adults Offer Kids FoodThink Safety First When Dining OutdoorsGetting Kids in the Habit of Healthy EatingHigher Fish Intake Appears to Reduce RA SymptomsHealth Tip: Make a Bright, Healthy PlateBreaking Bad (Eating Habits)Cooking Out? Don't Forget Your Food ThermometerReplacing Saturated Fats With Healthy Fats Lowers CVD RiskHealthy Dietary Fats Help Beat High CholesterolFDA Puts Brakes on Rule Requiring New 'Nutrition Facts' LabelCan Coffee, Tea Protect the Liver From 'Western' Diet?Protein PowerhousesCould Your Breakfast Cloud Your Judgment?'Beans' or 'Sizzlin' Beans:' Words Get People Eating HealthierHealth Tip: Enjoy a Safe Outdoor MealHealth Tip: When Your Child Won't Eat LunchThe Facts on FlaxDoes a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?Is White Bread OK for Some People?Add Fiber Without Extra CaloriesAmericans Are Getting Less Sodium From Packaged FoodAmericans Buying Less Salt-Laden FoodsLentils: The Forgotten LegumesHealth Tip: Grill a Healthier Meal
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Exercise

Artificial Sweeteners Trick the Brain: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Aug 10th 2017

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Aug. 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- New research may help explain the reported link between the use of artificial sweeteners and diabetes, scientists say.

Researchers at Yale University School of Medicine say that in nature the intensity of sweetness reflects the amount of energy present. But in modern-day life, the body's metabolism is fooled when a beverage is either too sweet or not sweet enough for the amount of calories it contains.

That means that a sweet-tasting, lower-calorie drink can trigger a greater metabolic response than a drink with higher calories, they said.

"A calorie is not a calorie," explained senior author Dana Small, a professor of psychiatry.

"The assumption that more calories trigger greater metabolic and brain response is wrong. Calories are only half of the equation; sweet taste perception is the other half," Small said in a university news release.

When a "mismatch" occurs, the brain's reward circuits don't register that calories have been consumed, the researchers said. Many processed foods have such mismatches, such as yogurt with low-calorie sweeteners.

"Our bodies evolved to efficiently use the energy sources available in nature," Small said. "Our modern food environment is characterized by energy sources our bodies have never seen before."

Small and her colleagues said the study may help explain the link between some artificial sweeteners and diabetes discovered in previous research. The topic remains controversial, however, and experts agree more research needs to be done.

The study was published Aug. 10 in the journal Current Biology.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more on artificial sweeteners.